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David S. Ware: A jazz musician with “a world of sound”

David Spencer Ware is an American jazz saxophonist, and a major force in the world of jazz music.

A graduate of Berklee College of Music in Boston, he has led his own jazz quartet since the early 1990s. He began his career on alto, and then switched to baritone, before finally settling on the tenor saxophone as his “musical voice.” In 1997, David was signed to the Columbia Jazz label by its creative director, Branford Marsalis.

David has had a life-long interest in developing higher states of consciousness, and at the age of 24 in 1973, he learned the Transcendental Meditation technique and began having the experiences he had been looking for:

“Your relationship to relativity changes. It is subtle. You feel a new reason to start your day. Something has begun. Something brand new. Something you were looking for. You didn’t know what you were looking for until you found it…Transcendental Meditation is quite a bit deeper and vast than it is normally perceived. It comes straight out of the Vedic teachings. [In these teachings], there are forty branches of knowledge. Meditation is the key to all that knowledge. Knowledge is structured in consciousness…. You can keep reading and reading and reading…That’s all intellectual… Intellectual understanding will help you understand your path, but in the end, it’s that one practice you are looking for.”

Mr. Ware experiences the ultimate value of TM practice in another way:

“You find yourself within that ‘witness’ consciousness, which is not waking…it’s not dreaming…it’s not sleeping. It’s something other than those three worlds we’re all familiar with. This is the transcendental state…the cosmic state…the state that ties us all together. It makes us all brothers and sisters. It’s deeper than blood.”


You can view of one minute preview of Amine Kouider’s documentary: “DAVID S. WARE: A World of Sound”

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Reference: “David S. Ware: Planetary Musician”
http://www2.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=37512#1