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What’s gotten into veteran CNN reporter Candy Crowley?

This past year has been a remarkable one in the career of veteran journalist Candy Crowley. The Washington Post reports that Crowley’s new assignment as anchor of CNN’s popular Sunday morning State of the Union program has been applauded by the public and media alike because of her sophisticated political observation, skillful speech, and determined fairness.

She is not the usual type of TV anchor. These days, anchors are too often brash and opinionated, with more than a touch of Hollywood flash. They are just another brand of celebrity.

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Crowley is clearly a different breed. As a frequent viewer of her show, I find that Crowley embodies the intelligent, broad-minded reporter who can easily handle a nuanced conversation expressly devoid of personal bias.

The Washington Post writes: “Crowley is beloved inside the halls of CNN and roundly respected in official Washington, a veteran political reporter who works hard and knows her stuff…. Friends and colleagues describe her as brilliant and hilarious…. This is a woman who has been a vegetarian for 15 years and kneels to meditate twice a day, every day.”

candy-crowly-showTwo years ago, before she started practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique, things were a bit different for Crowley. A veteran of eight presidential campaigns, she had begun showing signs of “battle fatigue” from relentless deadlines and incessant travels. So in the aftermath of the brutal 2008 presidential election cycle, Crowley decided it was time to make some significant personal changes to regain her health and resilience. One of the main changes was to learn the TM® technique and make it a part of her daily routine.

Early this year the LA Times interviewed Crowley and quoted her as saying that of all the new things she has adopted to make her life healthier and better, the Transcendental Meditation program has made the biggest difference.

“It’s a hard thing to describe, but I find that my thought is clearer,” Crowley recently told the Washington Post. “I still get mad. I still get upset. But I let it go more quickly.”

And that has to be good news for a high-profile television anchor covering the outrage of Washington politics.

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